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Hi!

I have a lot of questions about a lot of things, lets find some answers together shall we?

 

What did one nut say to the other:

What did one nut say to the other:

Ima cashew…

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: Two peanuts walk into a bar, the bartender says “Hey! We don’t serve your kind here” and the peanuts say “Fine! We were only here to get a little reaction outa you anyway”!  HA! Food allergy humour can come in many forms and amongst friends and people who understand, it’s mostly harmless, innocent jokes like the one above meant to crack a smile on the face of someone with a food allergy. If you’re anything like me, you use humour as a defence when it comes to the more serious nature of your food allergies. Because sometimes from all the seriousness, stress, tears, and frustration it can be nice and almost relieving to have a laugh at yourself or a situation. 

After 25 some odd years you get a little annoyed with the constant variation of “You can’t eat this?” or “Want to try this? Too bad it has your allergen” or the classic “oh no that totally has your allergen in it…just kidding!” or my personal favourite “Lets order this meal with extra peanuts for you right!?”  Oh, and not to mention,“You can’t have this, oh that sucks because it is SO GOOD!” All of these are of course followed by the I’m just kidding obviously tagline. It gets old real fast if you let it rub you the wrong way or take everything to personally. Which trust me, I get how easy it can be to do that.  Like everything in life we need to take jokes like these with a grain of salt. The people around you who know and understand your food allergies, only want the best for you and sometimes it's best to have a laugh.  I know for me, my auto response for is usually “Yes, I have an allergy or I’m allergic to this, and I have plans tomorrow or I need to see the new Avengers movie coming out, soooo I don’t really have time for a reaction right now, kay thanks bye”

It's all about knowing your audience, and how far you can take a joke. If it's a sensitive subject for them maybe don't? For me, I’ve been using humour to talk about my allergies for years.  I've found if you can help people understand the seriousness of food allergies with a bit of a twist like a joke it can help them understand and sympathize with you more. Also all that doom and gloom can wear on you and your mental health the more people put their fears of a reaction or foods on you all the time. Taking your allergies and the necessary precautions seriously is something we do all the time, no matter the time or place, who were with or what we're doing. Sometimes we want to extinguish some of those anxious feelings and tough situations by injecting a bit of humour so deflate a situation. We want to be careful not fearful all the time. It’s fine with me to use humour as a buffer, especially when it’s a tough subject and people can get easily upset or squeamish, but it’s important to keep perspective for both theirs your sakes. Make a joke, crack a smile and relax a bit and others will as well. Use your wits, throw in a joke regarding the situation and you’ll be ok; as long as everyone around you respects you and your food allergies, takes them seriously and cares about you.

If you think the jokes gone to far though, don't be afraid to say so and stop it to ensure they grasp the seriousness of your food allergies. 

Sometimes having a food allergy can be stressful, annoying, frustrating, and any other synonym you can think of. Wait, did I say sometimes? I meant all the time... and when it gets you down  sometimes what you really need, what we all really need is a good, well timed joke. A good laugh or razzing about your food allergies to remember it’s not all stormy skies. There are benefits and good things that come from them and a joke accompanied by a smile and some fun is just the thing to help remember that.

So, have some fun, make some people chuckle or let yourself laugh at a joke about food allergies. Relax a little and who knows this could be a new way to help educate on the seriousness of yours and all food allergies and intolerances.

Good Reads.

Good Reads.